Trap Neuter and Release Programs (TNR) Lead to Hoarding

Sarah Kelland

Organizations such as PETA and The Humane Society of the United States believe that the trap neuter and release programs for feral cats are not beneficial when their caregivers do not feed them or tend to their medical needs. A recent NY Times article “The Pathological Altruist Gives Till Someone Hurts”, supports this view.

The “someone” refers to a feral animal escaping the possibility of being euthanized in a pound. Hoarders think they are rescuing these animals, but they are unable to see that they are causing more harm than good. Their desire to save feral animals from death ironically leads to having more animals than they are able to care for which results in their death. Walk into a hoarder’s home and “you can’t breathe” and “there are dead and dying animals present.” This becomes a safety issue to the animals, those that live in the home, and the humane officers who come to rescue them.  This is selflessness gone awry.

A debate then arises: Is hoarding an illness or a crime? It is both in that it is animal cruelty in the sense that animals die and an illness in that the hoarders build a sense of self off of their cruelty; it is a symptom of a disease. As a result of the mental illness animals suffer and die.

A further problem that may arise is that among those who are willing to participate in the trap neuter and release programs are these hoarders, which in fact is more detrimental than beneficial to these animals and in turn defeats the purpose this program was designed for: An alternative remedy from euthanizing to reduce the feral cat population. Hoarding in effect leads to reducing the feral cat population, but in an inhumane manner. This runs counter to the motives behind the trap neuter and release programs.

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84 Responses

  1. Normally I truly enjoy your blog entries. But this one leaves me scratching my head. TNR has nothing to do with hoarding. Hoarders can hoard any type of animal, not just cats. Moreover, there are plenty of socialized cats for hoarders to hoard. Ferals are wild animals and cannot be brought into a home, much less a home with too many other cats. PETA is against TNR and believes ferals are better off euthanized because they say life on the streets is hard. But HSUS advocates for TNR. I agree that hoarding is a social problem, but this blog entry conflates hoarding and TNR in a way that is both inaccurate and bad for the feral cats that it professes to want to help.

  2. Sarah, I realize you care about cats and I’m sure all other animals. I don’t think you care about your readers, however. If you did, you would have not only made logical points (as Cathy points out) but you would’ve read your essay through at least once to catch and correct the numerous grammatical mistakes that leave me scratching my head! :-)

    Sorry if I sound picky, but you just wasted my valuable time by your haste. Please be kinder to your readers in the future, okay?

  3. Hoarders often do not neuter and seldom do they release. TNR advocates actually have a hard time engaging hoarders who think any animal not in their home is suffering and therefore needs to be “saved”. It is actually a step in the direction of quitting hoarding when someone realizes the best they can do for a feral colony is to trap, neuter and spay them and then release and feed the controlled colony. This blog is a disservice to those who have been working against a whole lot of odds advocating for the most humane and efficient form of managing the cat overpopulation in urban areas.

  4. This post strangely conflates “trap, neuter, release [sic]” with hoarding. The author’s term use of the term “release” instead of the proper term “return” illustrates her apparent lack of understanding of even the most basic tenets of a properly managed “trap, neuter, return” (TNR) project. The vast majority of TNR volunteers, who perform a selfless public service for the rest of society, are not hoarders, and never will be. True, a small percentage of self-styled “animal rescuers” are in fact nothing more than pathologically disturbed “hoarders,” but the post dangerously and inexplicably merges these concepts and ends up painting TNR volunteers with the “hoarding” brush. These reckless and errant aspersions do nothing to advance the cause of animal rights or welfare.

  5. There does seem to be some ‘cognitive slippage’ in the notions you express here. Hoarding and TNR are not the same thing at all nor does assisting with a TNR program make one a hoarder. Any program having to do with animals may serve as a beacon to those with psychological problems but I’m unaware of any research that suggests TNR programs attract such folks with any greater frequency than any other animal oriented campaign. Thanks for highlighting problems associated with hoarding…but you might want to re-check your sources regarding TNR programs.

  6. I tend not only to read but to admire your Animal Blawg and this post is incredibly surprising for me that not only believe in TNR but have saved many many cats from dying in the streets. I, myself, have 20 cats at home and 15 kittens waiting for adoption. That is 35 cats in my house and there are all completely clean, healthy, happy, and most importantly – ALIVE. This post insulted me and I am sure, many other readers. If some people are keeping cats in their houses going through all the sacrifice that it implicates, there is absolutely no right to put them in the spotlight suggesting is bad for the animals because IN THE MAYORITY OF THE CASES, IS BETTER THAN LIVING IN THE STREETS.

  7. Gotta agree with previous comments, as much as I Love your blog. TNR cats never live inside someone’s home (they would tear it to bits – literally, my friend had a feral in her bathroom for one night and it was destroyed). They get trapped, spayed/neutered, and returned to the colony where they originally returned. If TNR had anything to do with trapping ferals and keeping them in the homes of hoarders, that would be a terrible idea.

  8. This article does not make any sense to me. The title states that TNR leads to hoarding but does not go on to present any actual evidence or even anecdotal support for that assertion. I did not review PETA or the Humane Society’ websites or the NY Times article, but in my opinion that should not be a requirement to understanding the basic idea portrayed in the article. I would assume there are many successful TNR programs and that an individual TNR caregiver mistakenly substituting hoarding for TNR would be rare and certainly not a reason to discount such programs altogether. This article does a disservice to successful TNR programs.

  9. I would echo the above comments. Additionally, I note that PETA is notoriously anti-TNR, they advocate that feral cats should be killed, to preserve them from “miserable lives” (my life is sometimes miserable but I’d rather not be offed, thanks). Drawing a correlation between TNR and hoarding is pretty specious for the reasons the above commenters have noted. PETA’s weird agenda is all over everything they do, so they are not particularly persuasive when it comes to anything feral-related. Repeat: ferals are outdoor cats, so the picture included with the article is misleading to say the least.

  10. Sarah you state: Organizations such as PETA and The Humane Society of the United States believe that the trap neuter and release programs for feral cats are not beneficial when their caregivers do not feed them or tend to their medical needs.
    This is wrong: PETA does not support TNR at all, and the HSUS DOES very much support TNR. ALL TNR groups support caregivers feed and supply medical care to feral cat colonies. See Alley Cat Rescue’s website: www,saveacat.org (ACR was one of the pioneers who started TNR in the United States)
    I don’t think you UNDERSTAND TNR, nor perhaps hoarding?
    Individuals who hoard cats basically have mental problems, and don’t realize the cats they have are sickly and need medical care. They usually have sick and dying cats (also dead) cats in their homes. They almost NEVER spay and neuter…..TNR stands for trap-NEUTER-return back to their homes.
    Hoarding has NOTHING to do with TNR—-which is the ONLY way to control and reduce feral cat colonies…..catch-and-kill results in the vacuum effect. Other cats will start breeding colonies back to the same numbers as before.
    The National Animal Control Association and Tufts University both support TNR.
    Its the only thing that does work. If you do not support this program, do you have any new ideas then on how or who is going to catch-and kill millions of feral cats on the continental U.S.A.? Catch-and-kill hardly ever has worked quickly or safely on islands. I think if you do start to study this issue you will change your mind and HELP those of us who have devoted over 20 years to resolving this issue using NONLETHAL methods of control.

    Louise Holton, President and Founder, Alley Cat Rescue Inc.

  11. Hey Einstein – are you too stupid to understand the “N” word (neuter).

  12. Trap-Neuter-Return is the best thing going for the feral cats. I do agree that the feral cats must receive good food and fresh/clean water daily and shelter. TNR is not a perfect science, but it is pretty darn close. I have been doing TNR since 1995 and all the colonies I take care of do about as fine as the cats in my home. I do make sure they get canned food all the time along with decent dry food. These cats can live past 10 years and sure there are the dangers that they could face and do face sometimes, but is not giving these cats a chance at all the right way to go about it? It takes a dedicated animal lover with the ability to do TNR to make it work and there are many of us who are there to do it and if the community wants to accuse us of being hoarders, quacks, or crazy cat ladies (sorry guys) then let them come up with a better solution besides the death chamber. They won’t. It would cost an absolute fortune to build sanctuaries for all these feral cats just to get them off the streets (which is the only home they know) while that money could go towards more spays/neuters, vaccines, and cat food and gas for your car. Did I leave anything out? And if we turn our backs on TNR now, after all these years of progress, the kittens will populate in huge numbers again. Yes kittens are still out there, but that is from the lax from the cat owners who are to cheap and lazy to spay and neuter. So you see…..the folks who do TNR are here to help, not hoard. Sarah, you should spend some time with a feral cat colony caretaker, who is good at it, and your perspective will change completely if you are truly an animal lover.

  13. I agree with the other posts. This message is totally inaccurate. Lumping individuals who provide an invaluable public service with others who suffer from a severe psychological condition is extremely harmful to not only the caregivers, but the cats these same individuals aim to protect. I would strongly encourage you to thoroughly research these important topics and try again.

  14. Others have attempted to make the same connection. In 2009, Nico Dauphine, the Smithsonian post-doctoral fellow currently on trial for attempted animal cruelty (accused of putting rat poison in the cat food left outside by one of her neighbors) argued: “In many cases, the characteristics and behavior of people involved in TNR are suggestive of the psychiatric disorders described in problematic animal hoarding (Dauphine & Cooper, 2009).

    But this argument presupposes that enough is known both about “people involved in TNR” and “the psychiatric disorders described in problematic animal hoarding” for a valid comparison to be made. In fact, very little is known about either one. Randy Frost, whose 2000 article Dauphine and her co-author cite, begins by noting, “almost no psychiatric literature exists on this topic” (Frost, 2000). A year earlier, Gary Patronek (a collaborator of Frost’s, whose work Frost cites throughout his paper) observed: “Unlike the hoarding of inanimate objects, which may be linked with a variety of psychiatric conditions, animal hoarding has not yet been linked with any specific disorder” (Patronek, 1999).

    Nevertheless, both Patronek and Frost describe—based on some of the earliest research on the subject—some common characteristics of, and explanatory models for animal hoarding. And provide this definition:

    “someone who accumulates a large number of animals; fails to provide minimal standards of nutrition, sanitation and veterinary care; and fails to act on the deteriorating condition of the animals (including disease, starvation and even death) or the environment (severe overcrowding, extremely unsanitary conditions), or the negative effect of the collection on their own health and well-being and on that of other household members” (Patronek, 1999).

    This seems to have been the framework for the definition adopted by the Hoarding of Animals Research Consortium (with which Patronek and Frost were involved), which places greater emphasis on two key elements: denial, and accumulation and control:

    • Having more than the typical number of companion animals;
    • Failing to provide even minimal standards of nutrition, sanitation, shelter, and veterinary care, with this neglect often resulting in illness and death from starvation, spread of infectious disease, and untreated injury or medical condition;
    • Denial of the inability to provide this minimum care and the impact of that failure on the animals, the household, and human occupants of the dwelling;
    • Persistence, despite this failure, in accumulating and controlling animals.

    “Saving” 25 or 30 cats, then—whether in one’s home or in the park—does not constitute animal hoarding. As Patronek pointed out during a 2010 interview on NPR’s Radio Times, “numbers alone don’t define hoarding… you’ve got to have these functional deficits and denial, in combination with the numbers.”

    Opponents of TNR (and of free-roaming cats in general) will likely seize upon that second point, arguing that feral cat colonies—by definition—lack adequate care. But the very fact that these cats are part of a TNR program means they’ve been evaluated by veterinary professionals, requiring a concerted effort—sometimes bordering on the heroic—on the part of the trappers and caregivers involved. Some programs perform vaccinations (that this is not standard practice, is, admittedly, a controversial issue); at a minimum, cats deemed too sick to be returned are euthanized.

    A 1999 survey of survey of “101 individuals or couples who cared for 132 colonies of free-roaming cats in north central Florida” illustrates the importance caregivers place on health:

    “More than a third of the caretakers reported that they had provided some kind of veterinary care (not including being neutered at the TNR clinic) for the cats in the past or would provide veterinary care if it was necessary in the future. This type of care included booster vaccinations, parasite control, antibiotic treatment, ear medication, veterinary examinations, and emergency treatment” (Centonze & Levy, 2002).

    In addition, 96% provided food, and 75% provided shelter. It’s important to note, too, that these numbers are conservative relative to the care received by the cats, in that (1) some caregivers were responsible for multiple cats, and (2) respondents to the survey were not necessarily the individuals who provided food, shelter, and so forth.

    The bottom line: comparing TNR to animal hoarding betrays either a profound lack of knowledge about either one, or a desperate attempt to taint the former by association with the latter.

    Peter J. Wolf

    http://www.voxfelina.com

    Literature Cited
    • Centonze, L. A., & Levy, J. K. (2002). Characteristics of free-roaming cats and their caretakers. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 220(11), 1627-1633.
    • Dauphine, N., & Cooper, R. J. (2009). Impacts of Free-ranging Domestic Cats (Felis catus) on birds in the United States: A review of recent research with conservation and management recommendations. Paper presented at the Fourth International Partners in Flight Conference: Tundra to Tropics. from http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/pif/pubs/McAllenProc/articles/PIF09_Anthropogenic%20Impacts/Dauphine_1_PIF09.pdf
    • Frost, R. (2000). People Who Hoard Animals. Psychiatric Times, 17(4).
    • Patronek, G. J. (1999). Hoarding of animals: An under-recognized public health problem in a difficult-to-study population. Public Health Reports, 114(1), 81–87.

  15. This article is completely inaccurate. ehhh, I wonder if the writer is in High School, is just becoming familiar w/ these issues & does not yet know the definitions of TNR & hoarding, or that Peta is completely insane & should be ignored. Please do your research more thoroughly!

    Btw, Nico Dauphine has no right to speculate on “the characteristics and behavior of people involved in TNR”; she’s a despicable cold-hearted animal-killing nut job!

  16. I found this article to be confusing, especially when the author tries to link together two unrelated issues of TNR and hoarding. First it is important to get the acronym correct which is Trap, Neuter & Return. When the wrong word ‘Release’ is used it implies once the cat is altered you can just let her loose anywhere you choose, doing so puts the cat at great risk. The feline must be ‘Returned’ precisely where she was picked up, since this is the area she is familar with and this is the place she calls her home with the colony of cats she recognizes and whom recognize her.

    I must admit there is not much to add, since the above fifteen respondents so eloquently dispelled the many myths and misinformation that Sarah gave in her writing. I will just add that hoarders do not alter their animals, whereas altering is the basis for any TNR program. I dealt with a hoarding situation where 101 cats were left to die in a foreclosed home. The owner loved these animals, fed them, but could not recognize the harm he caused by allowing these felines to freely breed, none were altered. Two of us got them all altered, vaccinated, and fully vetted, before placing them.

    The second essential part of any responsible TNR program is the longterm committment of care-daily feeding, providing fresh water (even in winter), providing housing (especially in winter), and additional veterinary care when needed. Hoarders are incapable of being organized enough to even begin to provide this structured daily care, which is a seven day per week committment and one must find a responsible substitute if one wants to go on a vacation.

    TNR is so effective, while also being humane, that not only do the ASPCA, Best Friends Animal Society, HSUS fully endorse TNR, so does Alley Cat Allies, The Feral Fix:TNR program, Neighborhood Cats and my local group One Of A Kind Pets which has a lowcost spay/neuter clinic with a much-used feral cat program. The Cleveland Animal Protective League, located in Ohio in the inner city, also has a fully functioning, successful TNR program. Oh I almost forgot to add my own group located in Canton, Ohio, called Peace For Pets, where we offer TNR workshops and loan out humane traps.

    Mayor Bloomberg of New York City, believe me he is one sharp guy, fully endorses the many benefits of TNR that he has formed the NYC Feral Cat Initiative, a joint program with the Mayor’s Alliance for New York City’s Animals and the national program, Neighborhood Cats. Learn more by going to http://www.nycferalcat.org/

    I kindly suggest Sarah, do some more homework, than write two separate articles, one on hoarding and one on Trap/Neuter/Return, since they are completely separate issues. For the record I am against hoarding and I only own one cat. Now I do have friends who own several animals, but their homes are immaculate, the animals social, fed properly, groomed regularly, see the vet routinely and most importantly are altered.

  17. For those of you performing the only effective and humane way of decreasing the feral cat population, TNR, winter is coming and here is an excellent source for warm, insulated, durable, housing:

    FeralVilla!, The World’s Best-Selling Outdoor Cat Shelter
    Home of the worlds best selling insulated outdoor cat shelter / cat house.
    http://www.feralvilla.com/ – Cached

  18. Good points, all.

    For those people who call themselves “owners” of animals, you might want to check out In Defense of Animals’ http://www.guardiancampaign.com.

    And, for the record, in addition to the groups listed above, Nathan Winograd’s No Kill Equation includes trap-neuter-return.

  19. TNR _*IS*_ Cat-Hoarding.

    There’s now a valid medical reason why the iconic “Crazy Cat-Lady” as portrayed in media such as “The Simpsons”, et.al., truly does exist, Toxoplasma gondii cat-parasites that have infested a human mind. “Crazy Cat-Lady” is not just an urban caricature. This parasite actually controls human minds to ensure the survival of the parasite. (Not a joke.)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toxoplasmosis#Behavioral_changes

    http://wildlifeprofessional.org/blog/?p=3929

    http://www.economist.com/node/16271339

    http://healthland.time.com/2011/08/18/crazy-cat-love-caused-by-parasitic-infection/

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=127955946

    But “Crazy Cat-Lady” cat-hoarders don’t just hoard them in their own homes anymore. Now they have the cover-story of TNR (trap, neuter, release) practices and programs to continue their mentally-ill cat-hoarding behavior on public and private lands with even less responsibility for the well-being of their cats than they ever had before. TNR = Win-win all around for the Crazy Cat-Lady Cat-Hoarder.

    Get tested for Toxoplasma gondii infection if you are defending and assisting these highly destructive invasive-species cats. They are listed in the top 100 WORST invasive species of the world in the Global Invasive-Species Database and will destroy all wildlife in any area they are found in. Native prey becomes tortured play-toys for the cats, native predators starve to death from cats destroying their only food sources. And contrary to first impressions, the more well-fed they are the more they senselessly kill wildlife. The healthier they are the more they kill. These cats, genetically engineered through selective breeding, have the largest prey-base of any predator on earth and breed 2-3X’s faster than any native cat species in the world. They have no more right to be out in nature than some genetically engineered insect that, if released out into nature, would destroy all wildlife — JUST AS CATS DO. If your local government honors invasive-species laws (as they should), it is your moral and civic duty to destroy them on-sight wherever they are found away from safe confinement and roaming freely out in nature.

  20. TNR programs and their advocates are making absolute fools out of each and every one of you that they con with their nonsense. Not only are they causing untold damage to ALL native wildlife (directly and indirectly) and further spread of deadly diseases to all animals and humans, but are also doing *ABSOLUTELY* *NOTHING* to curtail cats’ breeding rates. On top of that, they are doing all of this while violating all invasive-species laws in existence. (Cats being listed in the TOP 100 WORST invasive-species OF THE WORLD in the “Global Invasive-Species Database”.)

    If you do the research, as I did using data from the most “successful” TNR programs, you’ll easily find that no TNR program has EVER trapped more than 0.4% of existing cats in any one area for over a decade now. (Even Oregon’s amazing 50,000 TNR’ed cats, at the end of this year will have only trapped 0.35% of them.) They simply cannot trap them faster than they breed out of control, no matter what they do. And those cats that learn to evade traps go on to produce offspring that now also know how to evade any trapping method used. So not only are >99.6% still and ALWAYS breeding out of control, and spreading their diseases everywhere, and still destroying ALL wildlife (native prey becomes tortured play-toys, native predators starve to death from cats destroying their ONLY food), but TNR fools are also ensuring that any future generations of these devastating invasive-species won’t even be able to be trapped. This is why, due to TNR-Advocates’ insistence that they have “the answer”, that their feral-cat population has now climbed to an ecologically-deadly 150 MILLION feral-cats across the USA. Soon to turn into 1.5 BILLION cats within the year if you apply cats’ breeding rates to previous population numbers. (That’s actually a low low estimate. The real number from calculations spit out by their reproduction rates is closer to 2.4 BILLION.)

    Find whatever way that you can to destroy all feral and stray cats on-site. Avoid using traps if at all possible because trapping is what slowed everything down to where cat populations have now sky-rocketed out of control. TNR advocates are at least right about one thing; trap and kill doesn’t work either because it is based on the very same flawed method that they use — slow, random-chance, inefficient, easily outfoxed traps. There’s a reason the phrase “hunted to extinction” is so well-known in all cultures across all lands. It is the *ONLY* method that is faster than a species can out-breed and adapt to. The following link (of a study done by the University of Nebraska) is some good documentation on the most humane ways to confront a feral-cat problem where you live; including the best firearms, air-rifles, and ammo required. Though avoid using their suggested slow and inefficient trapping methods that got us into the ecological disaster that we have now. http://deenawinter.files.wordpress.com/2010/12/ec1781.pdf

    On advice of the local sheriff where I live I used a .22 equipped with a good illuminated-scope and a laser-sight for use when they are most active, dusk to dawn; as well as to afford precision aim for a humane kill. I shot every last one of them on my property to restore all the native wildlife to proper balance. Mission accomplished! 100% total success! This is even a more humane method than terrorizing trapping and animal-shelter methods; and why it is the preferred feral-cat management policy in so many areas today. One moment the cats are happily stalking defenseless animals to cruelly torture again, the next they are dead and don’t even know what happened. Making your land 100% cat-free is something that cat advocates haven’t been able to solve nation-wide for 30-40 years. On my land only 1 person in only 2 seasons was able to accomplish what they couldn’t attain in decades. Why is that? The cost per cat was also only 0.3 CENT, 3 cats PER PENNY, a ONE-TIME expense (5000 rounds on sale for only $15). All cats gone for the price of a few cups of coffee. And contrary to another famous TNR-Advocate’s bald-faced “vacuum effect” LIE … NO CATS REPLACED THEM. The NATIVE predators and their required NATIVE prey that WAS here and BELONGS here is what replaced their lousy invasive-species cats that had destroyed the entire native food-chain. This year I’m even enjoying birds I’ve never seen in my life before. Two of the warblers listed in the top 10 songbirds of the world for their song. What an amazing sound to awake to each morning. You have no idea what you’re missing if you have cats by you. I now feel sorry for anyone who has cats. Their lives and world are dismally empty and they don’t even know it.

    May you have as much success as I did, and so quickly and inexpensively too.

    p.s. Avoid the use of poisons if at all possible that, if released into the food-chain, would go on to harm the very wildlife that you are trying to save from destruction by cats. And please bury or incinerate the carcasses so all the highly toxic diseases that cats now carry won’t go on to harm nor infect more wildlife or humans. Which, if you do a Google search, now even includes cats spreading the plague in the USA. So much for that myth that cats would have saved people from the plague in Europe, cats would have made it far worse, and just might do so this time around. Search some more and you find they are also spreading flea-borne typhus and tularemia now too.

  21. Look up the term TNR advocates just LOVE to use on how they reduce their feral-cat numbers, their candy-coating feel-good term of “Death by Attrition”. This means that their cats will die from disease, cat-attacks, animal-attacks, exposure, road-kill, starvation, and any other means that drastically shortens cats’ lives. ALL their cats suffering for how many months it takes to die that way. Just because they don’t see how that cat lies there, gasping for air, dying for days, after it’s been hit by a car or survived an animal attack means that it didn’t die inhumanely? Is that how it works with TNR advocates? They didn’t see it suffer to death so it didn’t suffer? Are they THIS self-deluded? A cat dying from poisoning is even more humane than a cat dying from TNR’s “attrition” (of which poisoning is one of the many methods that falls under the definition of “attrition”). In most parts of this country and the world TNR practices clearly falls under the guidelines for cruelty to animals, animal-abuse, animal-endangerment, and animal-abandonment laws. Including being in direct violation of every invasive-species law in existence.

    Let’s not forget how TNR advocates don’t hesitate to carve up cats with scalpels as well as cutting off parts of their ears, from which they have to heal-up for weeks before they try to survive again. As if letting them die of “attrition” wasn’t bad enough, TNR-advocates start them off by terrorizing them with traps, cages, and sticking knives into them first. (Which is also precisely why they can’t trap them a 2nd time to keep them vaccinated.)

    Not only are they cruelly torturing cats, but also all wildlife they inflict their cats upon. Their cats literally ripping the skin off of and clawing the guts out of any wildlife to use it as an agonizingly and slowly dying twitching play-toy for their cats. And as soon as all the “fun” has drained out of their play-toy, they go on and find another one to torture. This is no different than if cat-owners went to a pet-store and bought canaries and hamsters then threw them at their cats to watch their cats tear them apart for their amusement. What about all the native predators that depend on all those animals for their ONLY food? Their cats cause all those animals to STARVE TO DEATH. TNR-advocates’ cruelty knows no bounds.

    If you want to raise revenue for your towns and cities in order to deal with this invasive-species ecological-disaster properly and effectively, start charging all these TNR advocates with severe fines and imprisonment for CRUELTY TO ANIMALS AND VIOLATION OF INVASIVE-SPECIES LAWS.

    They’re not doing this out of any goodness of their hearts. THEY DON’T HAVE HEARTS, nor minds. Proved, 100%.

  22. Let’s get realistic here. Most feral cat colonies are found in urban and suburban areas, so one can not just take out their riffle or whatever firearm they happen to have and set up a shot out on the feral cats. This is illegal practice for obvious reasons.

    As much as people want to believe that country folk are into shooting any critter that crosses their path…..that it not the case. They too love cats and dogs and horses and lamas and birds ……You are not going to get the general population (in the city, suburbs, or country) to go along with gunning down Garfield.

  23. Sorry folks,
    TNR is not a no-kill solution. It is a no-kill-cat directly solution. A TNR’d cat just needs to kill one bird, lizard or other non-target species and it is no longer no-kill. Actually, simply feeding the cat means that another animal has to be killed…
    Let’s be honest about that. TNR is a no-kill-cat solution.

    Also, it can be argued that TNR is not any more humane than other methods of cat control (like trap and remove) – I think Peter Wolf has even admitted to this! (or at least has said it is a moot point).
    TNR advocates claim the science of the method is good enough to stand on its own. But, they can’t site any significant research that demonstrates that cats must be released in order for the method to work. The research on Alley Cat Allies own website doesn’t. In fact, it acknowledges immigration continues to occur – and that management of a colony must be intensive and continue for extended periods of time.
    I think TNR advocates are at least partly aware of these points. I think that is sometimes demonstrated by how much people like Peter Wolf go out of their way to vilify those who chose to use other methods. It is one thing to try and argue the practical reasons for choosing a particular method. It is quite another to make detailed one-sided attacks on someone’s character (that he has never even met) because you don’t like where they stand.
    And thousands of TNR supporters share the blame when they support this kind of vilification!

  24. Again……time for more reality. Until it is illegal for people to allow their cats to breed without a breeders license and then continue to dump their unaltered cats into the streets, along with punishments ($$$ ticketing) cats are going to be everywhere. Do you really want people to ignore this problem? The people who engage and support TNR know very well that this is not an all around no-kill solution. That is why a lot of them go to a vegetarian diet; for the sake of some animal rights. And yes, for every cat that is TNR’d that is about 100 kittens less to be born. Do you really think that by simply removing the cats all together, the land will be cat free? Are you kidding? How are all the cat owners in the USA going to be controlled?

    I understand how PETA has to give out an extreme message. It seems to me that they are putting out an offer to society only to get a compromised back offer. For the past 30 years, ever since PETA and HSUS has been on the rise; the animal rights movement has exploded. However, a whole society will splinter into different directions when it comes to this issue of animal protection. TNR advocates have never made the claim that it is absolutely no-kill. Everyone knows that cat food is a meat based diet.

  25. Clementine, you might find interesting a post from a James Henry found on the following page, reporting the findings of a study being done by the Texas A&M University on TNR practices. At http://www.theeasttexan.com/feral-felines-disappear-amidst-feeding-debate-1.2663164

    The important bit quoted here:

    “Now, being a wildlife major, I have a different perspective than most of you. For one, TNR has been shown by research to NOT work. There is no way around emigration and immigration. Cats are territorial and when neutured they stop defending territories. This allows other cats to move in, which increases colony size.

    At the beginnning of this study, we estimated the population size to be about 12-14 cats. By the end of the 9 months there were more than 30! I understand the population has dropped down quite a bit over the summer. This is probably a result of the drought and the 80+ days of 100+ weather. By the way, I have seen 6 different cats on campus this semester and the majority of them were not part of the colony when our study began. So suffice it to say the population did increase and would have continued so if it were not for the limited resources.”

    Yet more proof of what I myself had learned long ago when researching how far and wide this feral-cat disaster has spread — if a cat-advocate is talking then they are lying. 100% guaranteed.

  26. I now suspect the majority of cases where TNR advocates have reported fewer cats in their colonies are from thoughtful and considerate neighbors doing the right thing — trapping and killing them when no TNR advocates are around. TNR advocates never see nor care how their cats die. In fact they prefer it that way. They can’t handle reality, so what difference does it make if it’s sooner than later? By gun, car, or animal attack; it’s all the same to them. Out of sight, out of mind, it never happened. They believe all their cats went peacefully to kitty-heaven, no matter what. The SSS Cat Management Program, and its alternative, the TDSS Cat Management Program (Trap, Drown, Shovel, & Shut-Up) solves so many things. There is a bright side to all of this. TNR advocates’ pockets are now much lighter than they used to be. Driving themselves into poverty by playing a fools’ losing game while everyone else does the right thing just outside of TNR-advocates self-deluding self-imposed blinders.

  27. Lesslie Gresh, yes, if you destroy all the cats on your land, it becomes 100% cat free, and NO cats replace them. Native wildlife and native predators replace them, just as it was before cats destroyed the native food-chain. I cleared my land of cats 2 years ago. In all that time since only 3 have shown up, released by criminally irresponsible people. I quickly shot those cats as soon as they were spotted and my land is now again 100% cat free.

    Are you daft?

    btw: Are Siamese cats expensive? I sure hope so! Maybe the person that let them roam free might have learned something.

  28. I would love to think that I can control the whole county where I live, however since I can not do that I do the next best thing. I practice TNR where I can and control the numbers of kittens being born. And since my house is located in an urban area I would never take my gun out and shot anywhere in my yard, neighborhood or county except for any local designated shooting range where shooting is permitted. I do not wish to disobey the laws regarding shooting a gun. I am not aware of any county in the USA that allows firearm practice without regulations.

  29. Leslie, no, you’ll just release deadly-diseases onto your neighbors’ property contained in your cute little kitties. You might as well just shoot some of your neighbors instead of letting them suffer from the diseases that you’ll willfully and premeditatedly inflict upon them through your cats.

    I was right, you ARE daft.

    BTW: Any air-rifle that shoots at 700fps or more is nearly as effective as a .22, and they are legal to shoot many many places. (Though use pointed vermin-pellets for better penetration and go for a fatal chest shot instead of a head-shot. The slower ballistics speed might just glance off the hard skull, and you usually only get one chance, make it count.) Children often set up air-rifle shooting-ranges in their own basements and backyards.

    And another thing. Why do you criminally-irresponsible pet-owners and TNR-advocates lie so much and so often? So easily disproved too. Do you think your lies won’t be revealed so easily? Are you THIS amazingly STUPID?!?

    The general rule-of-thumb in the USA is that if your land is in an area zoned for livestock (if you can keep chickens or goats, etc.), then it is perfectly fine to destroy any animal, someone’s pet or not, that is threatening the well-being and safety of your own animals. The only animals exempt from you taking immediate action, legally, are those listed on endangered or threatened species lists. Even then variances can be given should there be sufficient problem but this requires further study by authorities. Since cats are listed in the top 100 WORST invasive-species of the world in the “Global Invasive Species Database”, this means they have no protection whatsoever from being shot on sight. And in fact, if your area enforces and obeys invasive-species laws — as they should — then it is against the law to NOT destroy any cat on sight, someone’s pet or not. It is your civic and moral responsibility to destroy any invasive-species that is found away from safe confinement and roaming freely in a non-native habitat.

    A cat-owner that releases their cat in an area zoned for any form of livestock has no legal grounds to sue anyone if their cat is shot. Even if the shooter walks up to the door of the ex-cat-owner and hands their dead cat back to them, saying, “I shot your cat, here it is. Better luck next time.” Though local law-enforcement frowns on this because the disrespectful and criminally-irresponsible cat-owner will just raise a stink with law-enforcement, wasting their time when they have more important things to do than explain to and coddle an irresponsible ex-cat-owning idiot. Hence the popular “SSS Cat Management Program” (Shoot, Shovel, & Shut-Up) method to save your gendarmes the further hassle by the ex-cat-owning trouble-makers.

    Besides, what difference does it make if the cat gets shot or ran over by a car or attacked by another animal? The result is the same. The cause is the same — the fault of the criminally irresponsible pet-owner that let that cat roam free. It only means they really didn’t care about that cat at all, so nobody else should either.

  30. As long as there are “no leash” laws for cats….it is not a crime to let your cats outside. TNR is not a crime either. Unfortunately neither is allowing your cat to breed indiscriminately. This is why TNR is so necessary and so wide spread. It makes me proud to know I am among the thousands of people who practice TNR . Hooray for TNR!

  31. TNR _*IS*_ a CRIME in MANY MANY PLACES. INCLUDING THE STATE WHERE I LIVE. A crime STATE-WIDE. That’s why it’s not allowed here. You lying and deceitful TNR-fools just never talk about those do you. Pull those self-deluding blinders a little tighter. They haven’t left a deep enough scar in that vacuous head of yours yet.

    Why do you think I previously stated:

    “Look up the term TNR advocates just LOVE to use on how they reduce their feral-cat numbers, their candy-coating feel-good term of “Death by Attrition”. This means that their cats will die from disease, cat-attacks, animal-attacks, exposure, road-kill, starvation, and any other means that drastically shortens cats’ lives. ALL their cats suffering for how many months it takes to die that way. Just because they don’t see how that cat lies there, gasping for air, dying for days, after it’s been hit by a car or survived an animal attack means that it didn’t die inhumanely? Is that how it works with TNR advocates? They didn’t see it suffer to death so it didn’t suffer? Are they THIS self-deluded? A cat dying from poisoning is even more humane than a cat dying from TNR’s “attrition” (of which poisoning is one of the many methods that falls under the definition of “attrition”). In most parts of this country and the world TNR practices clearly falls under the guidelines for cruelty to animals, animal-abuse, animal-endangerment, and animal-abandonment laws. Including being in direct violation of every invasive-species law in existence.”

    YOU *ARE* CRIMINALLY INSANE. Not just daft.

  32. BTW, thanks for proving yet again that TNR advocates really don’t care about cats at all. Even KNOWING that the cats you release will get shot, become road-kill, or die from cat and animal attacks, you are more than ready to release some more. Proud and happy about it even. This speaks TOMES about your character. None of which will ever win you any kind of respect nor reward.

    Here’s a little information to help the rest of you understand the behaviors of “cat-lovers” and their cats. Something I discovered when local “cat-lovers” (an oxymoron if there ever was one) were using cats to overtake my land and woods, eventually by even moving my property markers when using their cats had failed — because I got the legal go-ahead to shoot them all on my land. (An expensive many $1000s lesson for these property-thieves, surveyors are not cheap.) I often wondered why they kept releasing new cats onto my land even long AFTER they already knew that all their cats were being shot to death, they were told this is what was going to happen, and was happening. They didn’t care about cats AT ALL! Clearly something else was motivating these people. How many people do you know that keep releasing cats even after seeing many of them become road-kill? (Like every last TNR-advocate for starters.) They don’t care about cats, not in the least!

    Now you’ll know exactly why cat-lovers do what they do. It really has nothing at all to do with their concern for cats, nor even the lives of anyone nor anything else, quite the opposite.

    Human Territorial Behavior By Expendable Proxy

    I have come to the inexorable conclusion that the vast majority of “cat-lovers” and cat-owners that let their destructive invasive-species roam free, and especially those that defend the rights of feral cats to overtake private and public property and wildlife areas, are only (cowardly) using cats as a proxy for their OWN territorial behavior. Not unlike uneducated inner-city youth that will disrespectfully and inconsiderately use loud music to stake-out a territory for themselves. Whether this behavior is done consciously or subconsciously, the underlying motive is the same. As long as they can have one of their cats defecate in another’s yard or destroy their property, animals, and wildlife; and the land-owner not have any recourse; the cat-owner/caretaker owns that territory. It’s time to put a stop to them using their “cute kitty” excuse for usurping and stealing others’ property. If they want territory they can damn well buy it just like anyone else. Instead they’re using underhanded, disrespectful, and manipulative means. By putting (and sacrificing) live animals in the path of their envy and greed. Again proving why they don’t care about cats nor anyone else at all. “Cat-lovers” only really want your yard, garden, or forest while making all others and all other animals suffer for what they can’t have nor own. Bottom line–they want to control you and your property. That’s _ALL_ that “cat-lovers” are really after. It’s why they don’t care at all if their cat nor any other animals, nor even other humans, get harmed by their goals and (lack of) values in life.

  33. California is the only state that I am aware of that has The California Environmental Quality Act, which makes any organized TNR group comply with an environmental review.

  34. These exchanges have degenerated into diatribes from the Woodsman, an infamous fool and inveterate cat-hater who has nothing better to do than spend his time spewing nonsense. Ignore him and move on. Bottom line: TNR works, is founded on sound science and research, and everyone other insane woodsmen knows it.

  35. Why do psychotic cat-advocates always presume that if someone is removing a highly destructive invasive species from the native habitat to restore it back into natural balance that they must hate that organism? Does someone who destroys Zebra Mussels, Kudzu, Burmese Pythons, African Cichlids, or any of the other myriad destructive invasive species (many of which are escaped pets) have some personal problem with that species? Your ignorance and blatant biases are revealed in your declaring that people who destroy cats must somehow hate or fear cats. Nothing could be further from the truth.

  36. Verne, do provide some of that “sound science” of which you speak. All science studies proves that TNR DOES NOT WORK (another example just posted above). And not ONE TNR advocate can provide evidence that it does work. Do provide some evidence at long last. We’ve nothing but misguided and misinformed TNR advocates’ opinions being religiously spewed as “science”, like you just did.

  37. Yes, the author is clearly very misinformed, which makes this blog so dangerous. It is best not try write about something that you don’t know about. TNR is a proven strategy to reduce feral cat populations while letting the cats live out their lives. It has nothing to do with hoarding. Please think before you write. Thank you

  38. The only place it’s “proven” is in your demented imagination.

    TNR is a mentally-ill cat-hoarder’s paradise. They still get to hoard cats but now with even less responsibility than they ever had before.

  39. Just read the article “The Pathological Altruist Gives Till Someone Hurts” and there is no mention of TNR. Go figure.

  40. That’s because TNR has absolutely NOTHING to do with altruism. It is a purely 100% selfish act — one that completely disregards the health and safety of cats, wildlife, and humans. Apparently you missed reading the post about “Human Territorial Behavior By Expendable Proxy”.

  41. The title is “The Pathological Altruist Gives Till Someone Hurts”, You missed the word pathological. That is what the article is about. Not about good altruistic action.

  42. Then too bad that the author wasn’t aware of TNR and its advocates. They would have had a prime example to show the world what selfish, self-centered, self-serving, and 100% heartlessly cruel morons they be.

  43. Feral felines disappear amidst feeding debate

    By Cole Leonard

    Just read this article, which was the one woodsman001 suggested to Clementine earlier today. The reason those cats disappeared or died off was because the bureaucratic effects brought on by the college campus administration ordering the feeders to stop. After the first crop of cats died off, along came a new group cats (low and behold the vacuum effect). When the college administration realized they screwed up the first time they decided to implement a TNR program with grants from the biology dept. When the professor who was writing the grant took another job he did not finish writing the grant and the TNR project fell by the wayside. More bureaucratic non-sense.

    TNR is a success when the people are volunteers who can get the job done through perseverance, dedication, and heart. TNR has been on the rise since the late 80’s and it is not going to slow down as far as I can tell. It is staggering how many TNR groups are throughout the US. Nope, good people can not be stopped when it comes to animal welfare. As long as this is a free nation, it is going to happen. How else will they counter act real animal cruelty.

  44. Sounds like the feeding ban is working quite well to me. It may sound harsh to some of you, but limiting food sources that cats like is one of the simplest ways to control their population – no trapping needed. Though I agree with others that removing the cats would be faster and more humane.

    The “vaccuum effect” occurs when people put out extra resources (like food). This is what attracts more cats.
    Well-fed and altered cats don’t really have a biological need to be territorial. Research cited on Alley Cat Allies own website notes that immigration is a continuing problem in managed colonies. They fail to demonstrate that returning trapped cats is necessary.

    Of course, as Lesslie explained it, TNR can never eliminate cat populations, because when a colony dies off, more move in.

    And I will say it again. TNR is about a particular group of people’s opinion on the welfare of CATS – putting them over other animals. It is not more humane, it is not less cruel. It also doesn’t help when TNR advocates vilify others who chose to use alternate and just as humane methods of cat control.

    I wonder how well we’d have the pet cat (and ultimately feral cat) population under control if we did enact AND ENFORCE better laws pertaining to cats: mandatory spay/neuter, micro-chipping (to prevent/prosecute abandonment), enforce leash laws, ban outdoor feeding. I think pursuing actions like these would be more effective than TNR.

  45. Peter Wolf has helped to enlighten me on how others see a link between TNR and hoarding. Perhaps not all who practice it fit the description, but there is often a link in the behaviors. Starting with the fact that many who do TNR require financial assistance to do it… I find it particularly appalling when there is better financial aide (in the form of cheap or free spay/neuter) offered for feral, but not pet cats.

    • Having more than the typical number of companion animals;
    Colony caregivers often fit this one. Yes, feral cats can be ‘companions’ too.

    • Failing to provide even minimal standards of nutrition, sanitation, shelter, and veterinary care, with this neglect often resulting in illness and death from starvation, spread of infectious disease, and untreated injury or medical condition;
    Feral cat colonies tend to get less veterinary treatment, etc. than normal pets (just see the stats that Peter Wolf just gave – more than half in that survey weren’t getting recurring vet care and a quarter weren’t provided shelter). I don’t know of many cats that only need a one time vaccination or parasite treatment.
    Also, feral cats tend to live shorter lives than indoor cats. That means they are NOT dying of old age. (aka “attrition”)
    I don’t know who makes the standards, but I wouldn’t treat my pet cats the way feral cats are treated!

    • Denial of the inability to provide this minimum care and the impact of that failure on the animals, the household, and human occupants of the dwelling;
    I see the ideal standards of colony care put out by feral cat advocates, but rarely see any info on whether those standards are regularly met (actually I often see the contrary).
    Of course it is interesting to note that groups like Alley Cat Allies are against regulation of feral cat colonies and caregivers (whenever possible)- just check out their web page. Seems like they have something to hide here. Like how difficult and expensive it actually is to care for multiple cats– especially when they are not contained in any way. Or that care of feral cats is generally held to a lower standard than real pet cats.
    Many cat colony caregivers do not want legal ownership of their feral cats. Could it be because our pets are held to different rules? Maybe we should stop requiring pets to get their rabies vaccinations updated. Maybe we should get rid of those cumbersome leash laws, too.

    • Persistence, despite this failure, in accumulating and controlling animals.
    Many people feed feral cats, whether or not they can do anything else. They may be ‘trying’ to implement TNR, but…(excuse).
    Many feral cat caregivers have a blatant disregard for the law- at least when it comes to being able to care for their cats (leash laws, abandonment laws, lack of respect for others’ property rights, MBTA, etc). Yet somehow they are just as eager to point other laws out, as long as they protect their cats.

  46. Thanks for sharing your valid points without vilifying others, Clementine. What does MBTA mean?

  47. There’s still no such thing as their mythical and psychotic “vacuum effect”. They got more cats in their colony than they originally had because CATS ATTRACT CATS. They got MORE cats than they originally had. There had to be a loss of cats before there was any mythical “vacuum”. This is why my land has remained cat-free. There are no cats here to attract other cats. Feeding or not feeding them has little to nothing to do with it.

    In order to get the last few, highly wary, cats within my gun-sight I used an MP3 player with many cat-sound recordings on it played through portable pocket-speakers. Mewing kittens, cats in heat, etc. Toms would try to find sounds of mewing kittens in order to kill them if they were not theirs, and sounds of females in heat for obvious reasons. Females would seek out the sounds just out of curiosity. (Yes, it’s true. Curiosity DOES kill the cat. But only if you have a gun pointed to where they are being curious. Perhaps this is the origin of that saying — sage wisdom hinted from the past.) These cat-sounds ATTRACTED cats. They are also drawn to wherever cats are spraying and marking out their territories. Looking for mates and rivals through sounds AND scents. They’re not looking for other cats where there are no other cats. (I swear even most researchers are brain-dead when it comes to basic animal-behavior.)

    Throw in the T. gondii parasite into the equation that causes rodents to be attracted to wherever cats are urinating and you get CATS = CATS + CATS + RODENTS.

    Hints: For the rest of you who are using the Shoot On-Site/On-Sight method — which is the ONLY method that is faster than their breeding-rates and therefore the ONLY method that can catch-up to and slow their breeding — take note of this valuable tip to get rid of every last one. Build yourself an inexpensive cat-call by downloading all the free sound files that cat-lovers share online. Cat-lovers just LOVE to share the sounds of their “adorable kitty”. Put those sound-files to some good use at long last. Making “here, kitty-kitty” sounds will do no good. They usually run from the sounds of humans (unless diseased and in attack-mode). You attract them by playing back cat-sounds, not human sounds. For the most wary I even had to wear hunting-camo as well. And for those of you who are forced to use slow and inefficient trapping methods, you can slightly increase the efficiency of your Trap & Kill program by baiting your trap or trapping area with cat-sounds too.

    Also, to increase the efficiency of traps, surreptitiously try to find out and use the EXACT same foods that any cat-feeders in the area are using. Wild animals will only trust and eat a proven-safe food source over any new and unknown food. Use the exact same brand and flavor that the cat-feeders are using. “With Tuna Flavor!” from Brand-A will not be the same to a cat as “With Tuna Flavor!” from Brand-B. Their nose will detect the difference within smelling distance and become more wary. Put to good use what the cat-feeders have been doing for you — training those cats to trust only that food. Just don’t let the cat-feeders know why you are trying to find out what brand and flavor they use. They might change brands or locations. Valuable information for those of you who are employing the TDSS (Trap, Drown, Shovel, & Shut-Up) Cat Management Program at your nearest feral-cat colony. So TNR-Advocates can claim how successful they are at reducing cat numbers. Everyone’s happy this way!

  48. Recommended reading for catkillerwoodsman001:

    KINSHIP WITH ALL LIFE by J. Allen Boone

  49. at•tri•tion \e-“tri-shen, a-\ noun [L attrition-, attritio, fr. atterere to rub against, fr. ad- + terere to rub — more at throw] (14c)
    1 [ME attricioun, fr. ML attrition-, attritio, fr. L] : sorrow for one’s sins that arises from a motive other than that of the love of god
    2 : the act of rubbing together : friction; also : the act of wearing or grinding down by friction
    3 : the act of weakening or exhausting by constant harassment, abuse, or attack
    4 : a reduction in numbers usu. as a result of resignation, retirement, or death
    at•tri•tion•al \-“tri-sh(e-)nel\ adjective

    (C) Merriam-Webster, Incorporated. All rights reserved.

    Sorry, there’s mention of “old-age” in that definition. Though #3 perfectly fits the bill of how all feral-cats in cat-colonies die. This is why TNR violates nearly all animal-protection laws in existence.

  50. To the idiot “blessusall”, until you have respect for ALL life, not just cats, you are a total waste of flesh. And spammer I might add.

  51. woodsman001: Please post your real name and the municipality where you live, as I’d like to report you to your local law enforcement for animal cruelty. Also, just so you “know” — although I’m quite certain you will continue not to know much — neutered/spayed cats do in fact continue to defend territory. Territory defense is about mates, but also about food. Furthermore, altering does not completely remove millennia of instinct.

  52. Oh yes, please provide a citation for any place — and we all know you can’t — where TNR is “illegal,” as you claim.

  53. Clementine: Respectfully, I think you are Nico Dauphine. “Property rights,” “leash laws,” etc. These are the same unfounded arguments Nico Dauphine uses.

  54. And, Clementine, you are mis-citing information from Peter Wolf and from Alley Cat Allies.

  55. guest1, it will do you no good. Law-enforcement here are the ones to suggest I shoot all cats on my land. Educate yourself before you prove to the world the fool that you are.

    The general rule-of-thumb in the USA is that if your land is in an area zoned for livestock (if you can keep chickens or goats, etc.), then it is perfectly fine to destroy any animal, someone’s pet or not, that is threatening the well-being and safety of your own animals. The only animals exempt from you taking immediate action, legally, are those listed on endangered or threatened species lists. Even then variances can be given should there be sufficient problem but this requires further study by authorities. Since cats are listed in the top 100 WORST invasive-species of the world in the “Global Invasive Species Database”, this means they have no protection whatsoever from being shot on sight. And in fact, if your area enforces and obeys invasive-species laws — as they should — then it is against the law to NOT destroy any cat on sight, someone’s pet or not. It is your civic and moral responsibility to destroy any invasive-species that is found away from safe confinement and roaming freely in a non-native habitat.

    A cat-owner that releases their cat in an area zoned for any form of livestock has no legal grounds to sue anyone if their cat is shot. Even if the shooter walks up to the door of the ex-cat-owner and hands their dead cat back to them, saying, “I shot your cat, here it is. Better luck next time.” Though local law-enforcement frowns on this because the disrespectful and criminally-irresponsible cat-owner will just raise a stink with law-enforcement, wasting their time when they have more important things to do than explain to and coddle an irresponsible ex-cat-owning idiot. Hence the popular “SSS Cat Management Program” (Shoot, Shovel, & Shut-Up) method to save your gendarmes the further hassle by the ex-cat-owning trouble-makers.

    Besides, what difference does it make if the cat gets shot or ran over by a car or attacked by another animal? The result is the same. The cause is the same — the fault of the criminally irresponsible pet-owner that let that cat roam free. It only means they really didn’t care about that cat at all, so nobody else should either.

  56. Oh, and here’s a quick citation for you from one of many states.

    Florida:

    “This is illegal on Federal, State and Local levels. For example, it is a first degree misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of up to $5,000 for a person to deprive an animal of necessary sustenance or shelter. [FN122] It is also a first degree misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of up to $5,000 or imprisonment, or both, for a person who “is the owner or possessor, or has charge or custody, of any animal” to abandon that animal “in a street, road, or public place without providing for the care, sustenance, protection, and shelter” of the animal. [FN123] “Owner” is defined to include “any owner, custodian, or other person in charge of an animal.” [FN124].”

  57. What a useless article. TNR does work and helps reduce overpopulation humanely. TNR helps the cats and is the right thing to do.

  58. Linda, are you enjoying that immense bliss of self-inflicted ignorance that you don so well?

    This quote needs updating.

    “Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened.” – Winston Churchill

    In this case it is especially pertinent to women and especially those female fools who are promoting their illegal and cruel-to-all-animals cat-hoarding TNR hobby.

  59. I really wish Animal Planet would do a season of good TNR practices. They can do a show how the clinics run, the day in the life of a feeder(s), how the community calls for help with the cats they are feeding and how the trappers respond and organize TNR. There would probably be just a few shows b/c TNR gets to be routine quickly and not much drama to it.

  60. Woodsman001 and Clementine

    Why are you both so against fundamental kindness and decency?

  61. “Fundamental kindness and decency”?!? LOL!!!

    Thanks again for proving that TNR advocates are bonafide whack-jobs!

    I repeat (for those of you too brain-dead to read anything previously posted):

    Look up the term TNR advocates just LOVE to use on how they reduce their feral-cat numbers, their candy-coating feel-good term of “Death by Attrition”. This means that their cats will die from disease, cat-attacks, animal-attacks, exposure, road-kill, starvation, and any other means that drastically shortens cats’ lives. ALL their cats suffering for how many months it takes to die that way. Just because they don’t see how that cat lies there, gasping for air, dying for days, after it’s been hit by a car or survived an animal attack means that it didn’t die inhumanely? Is that how it works with TNR advocates? They didn’t see it suffer to death so it didn’t suffer? Are they THIS self-deluded? A cat dying from poisoning is even more humane than a cat dying from TNR’s “attrition” (of which poisoning is one of the many methods that falls under the definition of “attrition”). In most parts of this country and the world TNR practices clearly falls under the guidelines for cruelty to animals, animal-abuse, animal-endangerment, and animal-abandonment laws. Including being in direct violation of every invasive-species law in existence.

    Let’s not forget how TNR advocates don’t hesitate to carve up cats with scalpels as well as cutting off parts of their ears, from which they have to heal-up for weeks before they try to survive again. As if letting them die of “attrition” wasn’t bad enough, TNR-advocates start them off by terrorizing them with traps, cages, and sticking knives into them first. (Which is also precisely why they can’t trap them a 2nd time to keep them vaccinated.)

    Not only are they cruelly torturing cats, but also all wildlife they inflict their cats upon. Their cats literally ripping the skin off of and clawing the guts out of any wildlife to use it as an agonizingly and slowly dying twitching play-toy for their cats. And as soon as all the “fun” has drained out of their play-toy, they go on and find another one to torture. This is no different than if cat-owners went to a pet-store and bought canaries and hamsters then threw them at their cats to watch their cats tear them apart for their amusement. What about all the native predators that depend on all those animals for their ONLY food? Their cats cause all those animals to STARVE TO DEATH. TNR-advocates’ cruelty knows no bounds.

    If you want to raise revenue for your towns and cities in order to deal with this invasive-species ecological-disaster properly and effectively, start charging all these TNR advocates with severe fines and imprisonment for CRUELTY TO ANIMALS AND VIOLATION OF INVASIVE-SPECIES LAWS.

    They’re not doing this out of any goodness of their hearts. THEY DON’T HAVE HEARTS, nor minds. Proved, 100%.

  62. Lots of posts since yesterday…

    Bless Us All – MBTA is the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. It is illegal to kill native birds (without specific take permits, etc). While I don’t think this has been tested in the courts yet: if you know your pet (or animal in your charge) is killing native birds (just one, or many) you are responsible for the death of that bird (because you could have done something to prevent it). Similar laws in regards to agricultural livestock, however, are regularly enforced – which is why, as Woodsman points out, it is legal to shoot animals like dogs and cats on your land if you live in an agriculturally zoned area.

    Woodsman – sorry, you are right. I meant to use myth along with the “vacuum effect” too. Cats are attracted to other cats, they aren’t particularly territorial when they are altered and have excess resources, and cats are attracted to areas ‘managed’ for them (intentional or unintentional).
    Removing cats does not cause more cats to move into an area.

  63. Guest1- You seem concerned about people giving real names here, yet don’t provide your own.
    I am not Nico Dauphine. Though I have seen things she has written and I’ve seen the particularly nasty stuff Peter Wolf has written about her. He spends an awful lot of time vilifying her and very little time on why TNR “is the best option we have”. He seems to be going out of his way to try to discredit the scientists because he doesn’t have the science to back TNR up. I think, especially in his more recent posts about Dr. Dauphine, it is quite easy to see how he spins information – which does quite a bit to discredit him.
    Please tell me how I’m miss-quoting P. Wolf and ACA. Yes, I’m taking data they cite/quote – but I’m showing that they are misinterpreting it. ACA has a huge budget and resources. They have an elaborate website. Yet, when they cite the “key scientific studies” in support of TNR, they use ones that show immigration occurs! They don’t have any that show Return is necessary. They don’t have any that show this mysterious “vacuum effect” – as they define it.
    I live in a residential area. There are ‘leash laws’ here that apply equally to cats as to dogs. I can call Animal Control if my neighbors refuse to keep their cats off of my property- they can trap the cat and ticket the owners.

  64. Linda – again TNR is not any more humane than TRemove or even a quick death as Woodsman describes. TNR puts cats above other animals. I do not. I think it is a great harm when TNR advocates attempt to indoctrinate others that TNR is “the ONLY humane method of cat control. It isn’t and it isn’t a no-kill solution at all.

  65. Lesslie – Why do assume, since I’m opposed to TNR that I’m against “fundamental kindness and decency”? I suppose you think I hate cats too. Well I don’t. I actually live with formal feral cats in my home. They are awesome. But I love the wild creatures that share my yard too. Because I keep my cats indoors, they are able to thrive and raise young in my yard. They wouldn’t if I let my cats out or were managing a cat colony out there instead. Yes, I admit I value having a diversity of native species in my yard over a colony of cats – but this is certainly not less kind or less humane. It is wrong to market TNR has being any more humane! Again, I could argue it isn’t – I would never treat my cats the way feral cats are generally treated.
    I also have a sense of decency and respect for my neighbors – I doubt they want my cats or any one else’s defecating in their yard or rummaging through their trash.

  66. Significant typo correction to a previous post, wherein I pasted the definition of “attrition” from Webster:

    “Sorry, there’s mention of ‘old-age’ in that definition.” That should read: “Sorry, there’s NO mention of ‘old-age’ in that definition.”

    (Typing 130wpm does have its unique typo problems. The most common: the muscle memory in my hands will type a correctly spelled and similar word to the one intended, but the completely wrong word.)

    Clementine, thanks for the clarifications. Though it did give me an excuse to share more info on effective ways to attract the more wary feral-cats for those that could put the info to good use. And thanks for the information about MBTA. I suppose I should include that when mentioning animals exempt (are they?) from legal extermination on one’s own land. While I enjoy all the native and migratory birds on my land (one of the other reasons I shot all the cats here, after they tried to destroy my hummingbirds (and many other bird species) many years in a row, I strive to make my land a safe-haven for any and all native species, plants included) … I’m just not much of a true “birder” so I’m not as familiar with the laws concerning them. I’ve no problems with Starlings and other invasive bird species here so it’s never been something on which I need bother to educate myself.

  67. Clementine

    People practice TNR b/c they do not have the heart to have the feral cats put down and they want to give them a chance at life. Most are accepting of the kittens being aborted during the spay process. We live in a culture that values domestic animals greatly and may not be in tune with the native bird species such as yourself. The love for domestic animals runs deep through a culture of civility and humanity. However, you are completely off base when you accuse the TNR community of deliberately releasing feral cats for the purpose of killing off the native birds as well as being a public nuisance. TNR is for the community as well. You are greatly out numbered b/c you take such an disdainful attitude amongst your fellow animal lovers.

    I hope you spend more time setting up bird sanctuaries with a no cat zone. I know the TNR community would go over board making sure the cats are kept away from them. You could also spend more time working towards more control over breeding practices. One would think that the Audubon Society would be in favor of TNR since the laws are so lax for cat owners allowing their cats to breed.

    BTW…if you ask anyone who does practice TNR they will tell you that they wish that they did not have to do it all. How are you going to stop a whole civilization from keeping pets?

  68. I never said that the TNR community was releasing cats for the purpose of killing birds- I see that many outdoor cat caregivers express some level of concern about other animals. But cats are great hunters and most enjoy hunting, so a cat killing birds, lizards and other wildlife just goes with a cat being outdoors – whether you want them to or not, whether you see them do it or not. And once you start caring for a cat, you are enabling it to do the things that cats do. Lets be honest about that.
    I think that TNR helps to perpetuate the notion that domestic animals are more important than the native wildlife. I also think TNR desensitizes many people to the problem of outdoor cats. They start to think of them as natural parts of the ecosystem – but they are not – we made them what they are. Unlike dogs, the cat’s closest wild relative is actually a whole different species.
    I realize that it is not easy to intentionally cause the death of another living being. But it is wrong to imply that TNR causes less death and less pain and suffering or is any more civil. I am OK with that fact that some cats have to die because there is no place for them – I do what I can to make sure it is a humane as possible. Yes, it is our fault that cats are out there, and it is our responsibility to do something about it.
    I love sharing my home and life with (adopted) domestic animals. I have no intention of keeping everyone from having pets – not sure where you got that idea. But I do support laws that encourage responsible pet ownership and want those laws enforced. I would have much less problem with TNR if those who did it took on the full responsibility of ownership of the cats they care for (including keeping them on their own property). Also, there are many, many people who do view free-roaming cats as a nuisance. Unfortunately, many are unaware of the law, too ‘nice,’ or too concerned about causing discord with neighbors to complain about it – so the problem persists. Many people actually don’t really care what happens to a cat after it is removed – especially if they don’t have people in their faces telling them what a horrible person they are for letting a feral cat get humanely euthanized. Factory farms are huge wells of animal suffering, yet most people continue to ignore the situation and eat those animals anyway (and I bet most TNR cats get fed food raised in those factory farms).

    Finally, it is easy to find plenty of examples where the TNR community is against removing cats from areas that are supposed to be wildlife sanctuaries (like FWS properties). How do you have a cat free zone if you can’t remove the cats? Even in the presence of endangered species, there are plenty of cat advocates fighting removal.

  69. Woodsman-
    From the FWS website: “The MBTA made it illegal for people to “take” migratory birds, their eggs, feathers or nests. Take is defined in the MBTA to include by any means or in any manner, any attempt at hunting, pursuing, wounding, killing, possessing or transporting any migratory bird, nest, egg, or part thereof.”
    Migratory birds include all native species and exclude exotics. You can do whatever you want with starlings, pigeons, and house sparrows, but, even if they are on your own land you must get permission first to “take” a native bird. If you had them, starlings would good to control. They often displace native cavity nesters, many of which are in decline (cavities are at a premium these days). It is too bad cats don’t go after just the exotic and pest species. Unfortunately, I’ve seen research that suggests otherwise.
    I, too, try to encourage all native species on my property – their lives are all intertwined.

  70. Thanks for the further MBTA info (I suppose I should have googled that myself, though it never hurts to restate things in new locations to help educate others as lazy as I just proved to be). I’ve updated my info on “why it *IS* legal to immediately kill invasive-species cats” (zoning ordinances dependent) to now say,

    “The only animals exempt from you taking immediate action, legally, are those listed on endangered or threatened species lists, and any bird species under protection of MBTA (Migratory Bird Treaty Act).”

    Land ownership is often confusing, as it comes with its own special rights and stewardship responsibilities that will never even cross the minds of the majority of the population that rent all their lives. For example, you need a license to hunt small-game and only during defined hunting seasons. On your own land this is allowed year-round without any license. This is why I was confused on how MBTA applies to private property. I’ll presume, for the sake of those birds, that it applies no matter what. It’s the smart thing to do. [Though I'm not going to remove the Red-Tailed Hawk feather from my flute. It left it for me, I'm keeping it! :-) (Every year the feisty hummingbirds, during their fighting, usually leave me one wing-feather that I put to good ornamental use as well. I keep asking them to bring back a maraca or something like that for me, in trade for all the free juice they get, but I suppose they can only carry so much. They're not an African Swallow afer all. (monty-python humor) (p.s. I did a study on their preferred nectar and sent my findings to several universities. There's a more nutritious nectar-recipe floating around out there now.))]

  71. Yes, I do, too, save beautiful feathers when the birds leave them for me. It is generally understood that you simply found it when you have just one or two feathers. But the MBTA technically applies then too.
    You’re lucky, I’ve never found any hummer feathers – but I have been privileged to have the legal opportunity to hold one!
    I’m curious what your more nutritious nectar recipe is? I’ve always made the 4-1 sugar-water for the locals.

  72. [Off-Topic legal disclaimer :-) ]

    One year I had so many hummingbirds that I got concerned about feeding them only refined sugar. Surely natural plant nectars would contain more nutrients. I then surmised that brown-sugars, not being centrifugally-freed of their other natural plant components must be better for them. I set up about a half-dozen identical feeders with varying concentrations of different sugar solutions over a period of many days, altering them in location and concentrations often (so they would not be visiting just a favorite by location or territorial behavior). Then noted which were being preferred the most based on nectar alone. This was their order of preference from most to least:

    1. Dark Brown Sugar
    2. Light Brown Sugar
    3. Refined Sugar

    I would have kept the recipe to just exchanging refined for dark-brown, but it wasn’t that simple. Dark-brown sugar nectar, due to the added nutrients being enjoyed by all life-forms, ferments FAST. And I do mean fast. It can naturally ferment in only a couple hours on a warm day. This made replacing nectars a full-time job. So, we both struck at a happy balance between nutrition and human-exhaustion.

    Final percentages that allow for most nutrition and keeping it safer from fermentation:

    Sugar Blend:
    3 Parts Light-Brown Sugar
    1 Part Refined Sugar

    Nectar Concentration:
    1 Part Sugar Blend to 3 to 5 Parts Water.

    There is a definite range in concentration required and preferred depending on the weather. On cold wet days (they sometimes even arrive during a snow or sleet-storm here) increase the concentration up to 1:3. On hot dry days decrease the concentration up to 1:5. (This tends to match how plants create their own nectar concentrations, weather varied.) This of course depends on how happy you want to make your hummers and how much effort you are willing to expend to that. They will visit more often if you match their nectar concentration to the weather — their energy/water requirements for that weather. And we all know that happy hummers are good in the sack, raising lots of little hummers. (Fledglings are so funny to be around with their insatiable curiosity.)

    Note: no artificial-coloring required and should never be used, the colors on the feeder are more than enough.

    Important mention: There is one sugar-mix that they preferred above all others on this list and was not included above. That when available they would not even bother to visit any of the other feeders with other sugar-solutions. Fermented Dark-Brown Sugar. They DO LOVE getting their buzz-on. But this can be dangerous (and is probably why brown-sugars are often advised against if you are not attentive to changing them as soon as they start to ferment). It’s a little scary when you stand in your yard and you have about 50 little pointy-beaked and belligerent drunk hummingbirds dive-bombing you at the speeds they can fly. (I had one visitor that was wearing a flowered-sweater pattern one day who got so scared she screamed and ran for cover in the house.) But because I know that all animals enjoy a little ferment on occasion, I’ll sometimes, as a treat, put out some dark-brown nectar to let it ferment that day and let them get their party-on once or twice a season. (Then stay inside to watch them party from a safe location. Note: I keep my windows intentionally dirty to prevent bird-collisions. A simple answer to that problem.) If you live in a prohibition-state or always advise that anyone who drinks socially or on special occasions should join AA, then you might not want to do this. Running an AA chapter for hummingbirds could come with it’s own set of problems with animal laws and personal moral issues.

  73. [still off-topic]

    Awesome! Thanks for the info – very interesting! What a fun image of partying hummers! I know a number of berry eating birds that do the same thing… sometimes even on college campuses!

  74. [on-topic the off-topic]

    I envision a whole new cartoon-strip out of this, “Hummers @ Harvard”.

    There’s a nice little plus-side to this allowing them to party once or twice a year. By the time they have noticed that the feeder has started to ferment, they all gang-up on that one. If you have many hummers, they’ll empty it fast before alcohol concentration gets very high. And due to the way hummer-feeders are constructed, as the fermentation progresses, the natural CO2 build-up will start to expel the fermented nectar from the feeder, emptying most of it before concentration gets too high. So the time during which they can partake of their favorite vintage at a safe proof is rather self-limiting. Though do keep an eye on things and remove and wash the feeder when you start to have any concerns.

    I thought the related finding about concentrations was an interesting side-study in this. After I found their preferred sugar-mix, then it got me to question the concentration advice that’s been handed down for decades. Have you ever noticed days where hummers just seem to be lacking around your feeders? Now you’ll know why. Blame it on your nectar concentration not matching the temperature and humidity levels. :-)

    While all this is off-topic … maybe these cat-advocates can get a glimpse just ONE of all the amazing things they are missing in life by having cats around. Cats love nothing better to do on a summer afternoon than sit directly beneath a hummer-feeder to snatch them out of the air as they hover. With hummers being so trusting, they grow accustomed to anything that remains still for a period of time around a feeder. (I shot quite a few feral-cats by my hummer-feeder-station as they sat or crouched, starring intently above, twitching their malevolent tails.) An unconscionably disrespectful cat-lover will then say, “Hang your feeders higher!” To which I reply, “Why should I and all other native wildlife have to do ANYTHING to accommodate your destructive, disease-infested, invasive-species pet? There are no native animals around that will sit beneath a hummer-feeder to snatch them out of the air, so why should I do an unnatural act to accommodate your unnatural cat? How many native wildflowers do you know that are naturally-occurring ripped from the ground and ‘hung higher’ to keep hummingbirds safe from cats? And hanging a feeder higher does no good. During their feeding and territorial skirmishes, hummer’s don’t restrain their hovering behavior to just where the feeder is at — you pathetically ignorant, disrespectful, and inconsiderate moron!”

    Hmm…. it was more enjoyable being OFF-topic! :-)

  75. As this blawg’s moderator, I have grown increasingly concerned over the lack of civility in many of the comments on this thread. So here are some rules of the road going forward:

    There are to be no ad hominem attacks, no name-calling and no demeaning of other points of view. Disagree and debate but do not insult or attack. Failure to observe these rules will result in your banishment from this space.
    Thanks.

  76. It is absolutely possible to appreciate birds and wildlife and be in favor of TNR as proven, effective, economical way to manage feral cat populations.

    See “Outdoor Cats and Wildlife”

    “The purpose of this [site] is not to argue that sterilize and return programs are the best approach for managing feral cats from a wildlife perspective. When equal or higher trapping rates can be attained via permanent removal programs, wildlife advocates and organizations will logically endorse those programs over sterilize and return. However, where trapping rates can not be sufficiently sustained using prorgrams of permanent removal, we should be extremely cautious about undermining existing sterilization efforts. The worst scenario is one in which cats are neither sterilized nor permanently removed. It is critical to understand not just the ultimate disposition of the cats, but the relative trapping rates. The symbolic permanent removal of some cats in lieu of a sustained sterilization program will not be beneficial to wildlife.” http://outdoorcatsandwildlife.com/Sterilize.asp

    “Just like biology or ecology, logic is a science. Even sound scientific information will yield the wrong conclusions when interpreted and applied illogically. Unfortunately, that is exactly what has happened in the discussion of how best to address the problem of feral cats in the environment. In fact, we’ve blatantly committed just about every logical fallacy in the book. If we sincerely want to objectively analyze this problem for the purpose of finding the best solutions, we must avoid using logical fallacies in our arguments.”

    See the list of common fallacies with examples of their use in the discussion of how best to mitigate the problem of feral cats, http://outdoorcatsandwildlife.com/Fallacies.asp

  77. Truly feral cats don’t make good pets in the general sense of the word, so few people are going to bring them into their homes or take them from the pound when there are more suitable cats available. (The MEOW Foundation of Calgary does have an adoption program for certain cats they feel can be successfully socialized to living inside. A “hard” feral cat doesn’t want to be confined indoors any more than a wild raccoon does. http://www.meowfoundation.com )

    Facts: Hoarding is a mental disease requiring a clinical diagnosis.
    It is possible to live with several animals in the home and still be a responsible caregiver to those animals. Problems arise when there is substandard care and uncontrolled, irresponsible breeding. Problems may be MORE likely to occur in communities that do NOT have TNR programs or groups/city services who can offer assistance with spaying/neutering animals.

    Several problems can happen in communities where cats and dog licensing is implemented and there are arbitrary pet limit laws. Bill Bruce, head of Calgary Animal and Bylaw Services and Dr. Elizabeth O’Brian, spokesperson of http://www.CareforCats.ca, notes people who have more than the legal number of pets are not going to purchase licenses for those pets, even though they might otherwise be responsible citizens and provide excellent care for those animals. This not only reduces license revenue which could benefit shelter and community animals, like in the Calgary model, but also reduces the number of pets with ID, so fewer lost animals are returned to their owners/guardians.

    (Bill Bruce in a short video, “NCRC Interview with Bill Bruce on Ineffective Dog Laws”, including pet limits. http://vimeo.com/26979893)

    (Info on the successful Calgary model, http://www.no-killnews.com/?cat=69)

  78. I would not support TNR if I didn’t think it was humane, cost-effective and lead to successfully reducing free roaming cat populations over time. I wasn’t sure when I first became aware of it, so I did research and based on a lot of evidence gathered over many years from many locations, I fully support it.

    Example of a city with a human population between 300,000 and 500,000 successfully using TNR (paid for with license fees from owned cats; feral or community cats are not licensed): http://www.london.ca/d.aspx?s=/Animal_Services/Feral_Cats.htm

    “Get Informed: Discover what Americans Really Think is Humane for Cats.

    Most Americans believe killing is inhumane.

    Over 80% of Americans believe that leaving a stray cat outside to live out his life is more humane than having the cat caught and killed, according to a national survey conducted for Alley Cat Allies by Harris interactive.” http://www.alleycat.org/Page.aspx?pid=702

    PETA is the last major animal advocacy group in the U.S. that overtly opposes TNR feral cat control and no-kill sheltering.

    PETA is not an animal rights organization. They are opposed to all animal ownership. For a group that reportedly sees animals as equal to humans, they have lost credibility amongst those who are aware that they actively seek out animals to kill. PETA is required to file their documents every with the State of Virginia.

    This web page is by animal advocates who were PETA members until they learned the facts, http://www.nokillnow.com/PETAIngridNewkirkResign.htm

    If PETA believes animals are equal to people, why do they advocate killing adoptable animals, feral cats and pit bulls? If it’s to “save” animals from possibly being abused, do they also believe at-risk and abused children should also be killed?

    How can animals have the right not to be abused when PETA denies them the right to live? A dead animal has no rights. How can we teach that animals have value when PETA continues to treat them as disposable?

  79. Postcard from Ingrid Newkirk, the head of PETA:

    “Mr. Winograd,

    1. We do not advocate “right to life” for animals.
    2. There are always exceptions.

    Ingrid Newkirk”

    http://www.nathanwinograd.com/linked/petapostcard.PDF

    From “In Their Own Words”, part 1, http://www.nathanwinograd.com/?p=1414

  80. Your post, “Trap Neuter and Release Programs (TNR) Lead to Hoarding” is probably by a PETA member who is not aware of everything that organization is doing.

    About PETA, “hoarding”, and PETA defending abusers:

    “The Butcher Who Cried “Hoarder”

    http://www.nathanwinograd.com/?p=4091

  81. Woodsman HAS BEEN POSTING ON 100’s OF SITES the same exact wording. He’s obviously a landowner with a financial interest in being able to shoot cats on his property. Most of his arguments are distortions of statistics or irrelevant if you check them. Such as links to studies showing that fleas cause disease, etc. So what?
    TNR does help reduce cat populations. Those who promote it have the same goal as the landowners like this guy. Cats are just wild animals. The reason they are multiplying on your land is because you upset the ecosystem by killing all the coyotes, wolves, owls, etc. Certain groups are heavily propagandizing to advocate killing of all wild animals in favor of expanding human expansion, profits, etc…Successful TNR threatens their goals.
    Shooting cats is not the answer. Some of them are already friendly and have been set free by ignorant people… There’s a lot of youtube videos of happy endings with for feral cats. An example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3V0c3shTi-A . If the goal is to eliminate suffering, TNR helps. Also, these programs must be allowed to continue because eventually science can find a more effective way to mass sterilze cats via biotech and perhaps some sort of dna-altering substances which can be put in their food. (and which would only sterilize cats, not other species). Something like that. This would also solve the problem for landowners like the one who’s posting all this over-puffed comments.

  82. [...] Trap Neuter and Release Programs (TNR) Lead to Hoarding … [...]

  83. Need to get my kitten spayed

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